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Certification Watch (Vol. 21, No. 12)

In this week's roundup of the latest IT certification news, Oracle says you can't afford to NOT get certified, Certification Magazine spins a whale of a personal certification tale, and more.

Oracle Certification Says IT All About the High Cost of Certifying

 

Certification can be a magnet for salary increases.People decide not to get certified for a variety of reasons. According to a new post at the Oracle Certification blog, however, you shouldn't duck out on certification because it can (and sometimes does) come with a fat price tag. Blogger and certification program manager Brandye Barrington opens with a quote from legendary automaker Henry Ford that almost summarizes her entire post: “The only thing worse than training your employees and having them leave is not training them and having them stay.” Wise words, especially for organizations considering the certification prospects for staff. On an individual level, as Barrington goes on to describe point by point, deciding to save money now by not certifying can result in both missed opportunities and costly errors down the road. For example, certification can often lead to increased salary, with further increases accruing as you complete the cycles of professional development needed to stay certified down the road. You could miss out on a considerable chuck of salary over time by choosing to skip certification today.

 

Getting to Know All About You: The New Network+ from CompTIA

 

Tech industry association CompTIA's newly overhauled Network+ certification has been in the field for a couple of weeks now, but if you're just waking up to the "new car" smell of N10-007, then you may want to click over to CompTIA's IT Career News blog. IT trainer and guest blogger Anthony Sequeira kicks the tires and slams the doors, giving a brief review of changes to the long-established warhorse of vendor-neutral IT networking credentials. Sequeira's assessment is particularly valuable for providing insight from the perspective of someone preparing to train for and take the new exam. For example, he thinks the length and timing established by the new exam is just about perfect, with 90 minutes allotted for candidates to attempt 90 different questions. In Sequeira's words, "Ninety minutes for a maximum of 90 questions might sound crazy, but the multiple-choice questions are short and straightforward enough that many can be answered in about 20 seconds or less." He gives further props to the exam designers for, among other things, limiting the amount of security-related questions, and focusing on troubleshooting.

 

DevOps: It's Not Just for Software Developers Anymore

 

People have been upacking the hot new buzzword "DevOps" for a few years now, and blogger Gary Pfitzer contributed a nicely pithy definition of his own this week over at the Talking Tech with Cisco blog of Cisco Learning Network. The topic of DevOps is on Pfitzer's mind because Cisco's DevNet team is in the process of establishing parameters for what it calls "NetDevOps." For those of you out there shrieking in despair about needing to embrace an all new spin on something you were tired of hearing about in 2016, well, calm yourselves. DevOps has been settling in and gradually becoming less scary for a while now, and NetDevOps will probably soon feel as familiar as a shielded twisted pair (STP) cable. You may have noticed that we aren't taking any pains to put NetDevOps in a nutshell of our own making. Pfitzer does that so well: That's what we linked to his blog post for in the first place.